Publications

FAO estimates that each year, approximately one-third of all food produced for human consumption in the world is lost or wasted. This food wastage represents a missed opportunity to improve global food security, but also to mitigate environmental impacts and resources use from food chains. Although there is today a wide recognition of the major environmental implications of food production, no study has yet analysed the impacts of global food wastage from an environmental perspective.

 

A regional strategy for sustainable agricultural mechanization (2015)

Icon a regional strategy for sustainable agricultural mechanization

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Report on the High-Level Multi-stakeholder Consultation on Food Losses and Food Waste in Asia and the Pacific Region (2014)

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Children Book – Food is Life SAVE FOOD (English version)

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Children Book – Food is Life SAVE FOOD (Mongolian version)

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Children Book – Food is Life SAVE FOOD (Tetum version)

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Reducing Food Losses and Waste in Asian Countries for Improved Food Security and  Agri-food Chain Efficiency (2014)

 

Reducing food losses and waste - Rolle

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Food wastage footprint, Impacts on natural resources (2013)

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FAO estimates that each year, approximately one-third of all food produced for human consumption in the world is lost or wasted. This food wastage represents a missed opportunity to improve global food security, but also to mitigate environmental impacts and resources use from food chains. Although there is today a wide recognition of the major environmental implications of food production, no study has yet analysed the impacts of global food wastage from an environmental perspective.

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Toolkit, Reducing the Food Wastage Footprint (2013)

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The aim of the Toolkit is to showcase concrete examples of good practices for food loss and waste reduction, while pointing to information sources, guidelines and pledges favoring food wastage reduction. The inspirational examples featured throughout this Toolkit demonstrate that everyone, from individual households and producers, through governments, to large food industries, can make choices that will ultimately lead to sustainable consumption and production patterns, and thus, a better world for all.

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Good practice in the design, management and operation of a fresh produce packing-house (2012)

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Changes in the marketing structure for fresh produce in the Asia-Pacific region and growing consumer demand for fresh produce that is safe and of good quality means there is a need to focus on the implementation of good practices in fresh produce supply chains. Within the post-harvest system, well designed packing-house facilities that conform to the principles of good manufacturing practices and which are equipped with an appropriate level and scale of post-harvest technology are important components of the infrastructural base to support value addition, quality and safety management in fresh produce supply chains. This publication documents good practices in the design, management and operation of fresh produce packing-houses and is intended as a resource guide for key stakeholders in the region such as extension specialists, farmer organizations, clusters and cooperatives.

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Value Chain development and post-harvest loss reduction for smallholder farmers (2012)

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 Packaging in fresh produce supply chains in Southeast Asia (2011)

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Packaging is very often critical to the success or failure of horticultural supply chains. Improved packaging can greatly contribute to improving efficiency in supply chain management and can increase returns for producers and retailers while delivering top quality fresh produce to consumers. Bulk packaging of fresh produce in Southeast Asian countries ranges from traditional bamboo baskets and wooden crates to plastic crates and corrugated fibreboard boxes used for export. This publication documents the results of surveys commissioned by FAO in three countries – the Philippines, Thailand and Viet Nam – to provide comprehensive, up-to-date reviews on fresh produce packaging in the region’s supply chains. Information presented in the publication is based on field surveys, interviews with supply chain stakeholders and experts, and references from available sources. The information and recommendations provided in this publication are intended to stimulate action on measures to sustainably reduce losses and enhance marketability across fresh produce chains in the region through improved packaging practices.

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 Appropriate food packaging solutions for developing countries (2011)

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The study assesses the state of packaging and packaging technologies in developing countries, with the challenge of global food losses and the potential for agri-food systems as the backdrop. The purpose of
the exercise is to identify packaging solutions in developing countries, within the limits of prevailing levels of development and conditions, and in an attempt to make better use of the locally available packaging materials. This is done within the framework of developing countries’ role as major supplier to the global food system and, consequently, as contributor to the search for global food loss solutions.

 

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 Global food losses and food waste (2011)

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The study highlights the losses occurring along the entire food chain, and makes assessments of their magnitude. Further, it identifies causes of food losses and possible ways of preventing them. The results of the study suggest that roughly one-third of food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted globally, which amounts to about 1.3 billion tons per year. This inevitably also means that huge amounts of the resources used in food production are used in vain, and that the greenhouse gas emissions caused by production of food that gets lost or wasted are also missions in vain.

 

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Processing of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables: a technical guide (2010)

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There has been a marked upward trend in production and consumption of fruits and vegetables in Asia and the Pacific in recent years. Along with rising consumer demand has come greater awareness of food safety issues and increased need for convenience and quality. Selection of high quality horticultural produce for processing and implementation of good practices during processing operations are required to assure both the quality of the produce and the safety of the final product. This technical guide reviews, from a theoretical and practical perspective, the critical issues that must be addressed for fresh-cut produce to meet consumer demand for convenience, quality and safety. A case study on fresh-cut processing in Thailand is included. The guide should be of practical value to small processors, trainers and extension workers who provide support to individuals engaged in production of fresh-cut tropical produce for sale.

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Management of reusable plastic crates in fresh produce supply chains: A technical guide (2009)

pub10-Management of reusable plasticsIncreased fruit and vegetable production in many countries of Asia and the Pacific has not been accompanied by improvements in post-harvest handling to maintain quality and assure safety. FAO continues to provide technical support and to build capacities to reduce losses and to improve quality and safety management in fruit and vegetable supply chains. One such example is use of plastic crates for the bulk packaging of fresh produce. This technical guide highlights Good Manufacturing Practices for the handling and storage of reusable plastic crates and protocols for their cleaning and sanitization. It also documents a model of an efficient management system for returnable plastic crates. This guide is targeted primarily for use by returnable plastic crate service providers and stakeholders in fresh produce handling chains: producers, packing house operators, and transport and storage operators. Individuals who are involved with capacity building activities in horticultural chains as well as policy makers should also find it a useful reference.

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 Horticultural Chain Management for Countries of Asia and the Pacific: A Training Package (2009)

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In 2005 FAO embarked upon the design and development of training of trainer programmes to strengthen capacities in horticultural chain management. With funding from the Commonwealth Secretariat, a formal agreement was established with the University of Pretoria, South Africa, to develop a training package focused on practical approaches to assuring the safety and quality of horticultural produce and on the efficient organization of horticultural chains to improve the competitiveness of small and medium enterprises in East and Southern Africa. In 2008 a formal agreement was established with King Mongkut’s University of Technology, Thailand to tailor the original training package (consisting of a theoretical manual and a practical manual) to the context of Asia and the Pacific region and to test the adapted training materials by means of a subregional training programme for the least developed countries of the region. This training package is structured to provide trainers in Asia and the Pacific region with sufficient technical background and reference materials to allow them to customize training in accordance with the needs of the target groups to be trained. It includes a number of practical exercises that are designed to reinforce and enhance an understanding of theoretical issues presented in the theoretical modules. It is hoped that the training package will stimulate improvements in horticultural chains across Asia and the Pacific region, leading to safer produce of higher quality, to reduced losses and to better economic returns for small and medium enterprises and small-scale producers.

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